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Check out the Calorie and Gram Calculator here. 

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Fitness, Drill, Diet, and Supplement Tricks

If you are interested here are some great books on wrestling I have found.  Will help improve anyone at any level.  They are must read books for any wrestler with a desire to improve.

Legends of Wrestling 2  

Russian Wrestling Team

Winning Wrestling Moves  

Greco-Roman Wrestling

 

 

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A Wrestling Workout

RECOMMENDED DIET FOR WEIGHT LOSS, WRESTLING ATHLETES

Wrestling and bodybuilding workouts

Wrestling Endurance

Ultimate training for the ultimate warrior

Wrestling Drills

Nutrition Guidelines

Intensity

Discover the secrets to building muscle and losing fat - guaranteed.

Weight training for wrestling

Endurance Program

What About Strength and Power?

Stretching and Flexibility

Conditioning Routines O'Plenty

Tips for increasing foot speed and coordination

Wrestling Training Tips For Pre-Season

Me and my Gator Gum

To Stretch

Daily Nutrition Tips

Wrestling: Making Weight and Staying Strong

 

NCAA Wrestling Weight Loss Program Download

A Wrestling Workout

I have been known to wrestle on occasion. I am not talking WWF wrestling like Hulk Hogan, but rather Greco Roman and Freestyle. So I have been researching a typical wrestling workout for you to use and adapt. This workout is a combination of strength training and cardiovascular training. I have not included a diet, but do expect you to follow a healthy, balanced diet plan. As I will mention later this is not a bodybuilding training guide, so do not cut out foods such as milk and high carb foods. You are not training for a perfect physique and the foods I have just mentioned are vital to fuel and build your body for wrestling. As you will see in this article, I have emphasised how important warming up and stretching is, don't take that lightly, it will save you from serious injury.

So here it is, my wrestling training guide. Follow it the best you can, but remember always change things to suit you, be careful not to over do it.

Day 1

Begin with a nice warm-up. Rope jumping is the best, because it warms the whole body and helps keep us on our toes -- good for agility! If you do not have a jump rope, buy one. It is the best investment you can make.

5 minutes - JUMP ROPE

You will then stretch out, a nice full body stretch. Start with the calves and work up to the legs, groin, lower back, upper back, arms, shoulders, and always the neck.

10 minutes - STRETCH

Today is a powerful upper body workout that will take 40 minutes to do. It needs to be explosive and intense, just like if you were wrestling. We can't train like a marathon runner because we're not marathon runners. We are wrestlers - ANIMALS - and everything is explosive. Remember: always lift with a partner, and take 1 minute rest in between sets. IF YOU HAVE NEVER WEIGHTLIFTED BEFORE, YOU SHOULD SPEND A COUPLE OF WEEKS LEADING UP TO THIS ROUTINE.

40 minutes - WEIGHTLIFTING

This isn't a bodybuilding workout, so don't train like it is. We train intensely and get the most out of what little time we can devote to weightlifting. Your upper body should be tired, so now condition your legs and lungs. Hit the streets for a little run.

2 MILE RUN

If you can't make 2 miles in 15 minutes, start off with one mile slowly and work your way up to 2 miles - faster and faster.

After this we should be pretty tired, but we're not done yet. You should be exhausted, so now it's time for exhaust training. In wrestling, we get tired during our matches but we cannot be scared of that. We need to push through those times. In wrestling, the winner often emerges as the better-conditioned athlete and not always the better technician...be better conditioned than your opponent and you will start each match with an important advantage.

Immediately after the 2 mile run, we will do 10 100-yard dashes, with 15 seconds rest in between each sprint.

10 100-YARD SPRINTS

Take it easy on your first day. Cool down and stretch out - but before you do, grab the jump rope and jump for a couple minutes to come down off your high intensity level.

5 minutes - JUMP ROPE
10 minutes - STRETCH


SAFETY

Remember, progression is the key, don't start out at full steam. For optimum results and safety, build up to everything. Another important thing to remember is do not rush into competing. Ensure you are well conditioned and ready. You can be injured both physically and mentally by competing to early, so have patience, it will be worth it.

So there we have it, my wrestling training guide. If you are already a wrestler or want to get into wrestling, I'm certain this article is a good place to start. Now get started and who knows, you could be an Olympic gold medallist.

Michael Pope

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RECOMMENDED DIET FOR WEIGHT LOSS, WRESTLING ATHLETES

The following diet was planned to ensure adequate vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates and protein while limiting calories for weight loss. The 1900-calorie sample diet provides adequate amounts of most nutrients for a male, age 19-22. The nutrient zinc is present at only 80% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA); thus it is advised that a multi-vitamin/mineral tablet containing 100% of the RDA for zinc be taken two to three times per week. The higher calorie diets contain at least 100% of all essential nutrients. Protein in the diets meets the RDA for protein of a 290 pound man. Dietary carbohydrate provides greater than 60% of the calories, which is suggested for athletes in order to supply the body with adequate glycogen for energy. Calories in the diet are reduced through limiting the use of fats and oils.

It is very important when losing weight that the athlete loses excess fat instead of valuable body fluids, muscle or organ protein. To prevent the wasting away of lean body mass during weight loss, an athlete should lose only one to two pounds per week. Weight loss techniques such as sweat baths, fasting, vomiting, using laxatives or diuretics or denying the body fluids may produce rapid weight loss. However, these weight loss techniques result in body water loss and muscle loss and hurt athletic performance weight. If weight stays within five to ten pounds of performance weight, an athlete should be able to lose that weight in three to five weeks without using weight loss techniques that can harm athletic performance.

The 1900-calorie weight loss plan described in this text may be too low in calories for some athletes. Instructions on how to estimate caloric need are included below. Athletes whose calorie need is greater than 1900 should add additional calories according to the instructions in the section "Meal Plan for Higher Calorie Diets."

Keep in mind that each body is different. If you find that you are losing weight too quickly or too slowly, that you are tired or weak, or even that you don't like any of the food choices offered-speak up! Your coach, doctor and/or nutritionist can design a weight loss diet that more specifically meets your needs.

After you have lost the necessary amount of weight, continue eating a well-balanced, high-carbohydrate diet. This will help you to maintain your performance weight.

BY KAREN MOSES

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Ultimate Training For The Ultimate Warrior

BRAND NEW - This brand new training manual is the first of its kind. This program has been developed specifically for combat athletes seeking to develop functional strength, explosive power, and unstoppable endurance. This guide includes the most comprehensive sandbag training section ever created, in addition to the most intense conditioning program ever assembled. Learn about sandbag lifting, sledgehammer training, GPP, interval training, sport-specific conditioning, program creation, sled dragging, bodyweight exercise, core training, and more. This program also includes SEVERAL complete training programs. No more guesswork, everything you need is contained within this comprehensive training manual. Learn More

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Wrestling and bodybuilding workouts

 

bullet

Workouts must be as short as possible while working as many muscles as possible, so short and intense.

bullet

Workouts should be infrequent enough so that your wrestling doesn't suffer and you don't lose muscle, but frequent enough to cause your muscles to adapt and become stronger.

bullet

Don't concentrate on gaining loads on your lifts, focus on stimulating muscle fibers to prevent muscle catabolism, trying to gain on you lifts will only distract from your wrestling which is much more important in seasons 

Those are the basic principles, short and intense so you don't overtrain, plenty of rest for the same reason, and focusing on preventing muscle breakdown rather than trying to build yourself up. 

 

Those are the principles, but what style of training employs them? Not a traditional bodybuilding approach, something many meatheads don't even discuss because it sounds like a wimpy form of "fitness" not hard-core muscle building. I'm talkin' about circuit training. Where you go between stations without any rest (intensity), do only 1 or 2 sets of an exercise (low volume to prevent overtraining) and you can train the whole body in a short time so you only need to do it once or twice a week (frequency). It also sounds a lot like the HIT philosophy of just 1 or 2 sets to failure of an exercise, with little rest between exercises.
Its simple, a total body routine twice a week if your not under a lot of stress, or if your trying to lose weight to get into you class you should probably just go with once a week. You should try to eat right all the time and stay in your weight class, but I know most wrestlers don't have the discipline for this and just do a "quick fix" the last week or so and crash diet and run constantly, or take diuretics or wear hot clothing to sweat their weight out. 

 

That's very unhealthy but I know most of you will do it anyway. The best way to lose weight quickly is to go on a low sodium diet, eat low sodium tuna, plain noodles and rice, etc. I'd go on this diet for about a week, its really strict and very difficult, just read some labels and do some research and you'll find out how much sodium is in most foods. While on this diet I ate a banana or two EVERY day because sodium and potassium play similar roles in the body, except potassium doesn't cause fluid retention, and is much healthier, and bananas contain a lot of potassium. 

 

Don't severely restrict your carbs or protein, though you might want to cut out some fat. You need those carbs and protein so you can concentrate in your match. So, a low sodium, high potassium, low fat diet combined with a total body circuit once or twice a week should help loads with your wrestling strength.

The workout. I'm going to suggest a workout here but its only a recommendation. Basically you should work the muscles from largest to smallest, in quick succession with each set to concentric failure. Here's what I think is a very good workout for wrestlers:

Squat: 2 sets 6-8, 1 minute rest between each set 
Chins: 1 set to failure 
barbell rows: 1 set to failure 
Arnold press: 1 set to failure 
Lateral raises: 1 set to failure 
Flat bench: 1 set to failure 
French Presses: 1 set to failure 
barbell curls: 21's 
Calf presses/raises: 2 sets to failure


You probably do plenty of ab work in practice, at least we did, so I won't include that. You should go from one exercise to the next, with no rest. The key is to get in there, hit your muscles, and get out before they start breaking down. You shouldn't ever be so sore during practice that it hinders your performance. 

 

You shouldn't get very sore at all unless your just beginning, if you just beginning you might be sore after the first couple workouts but it'll go away so don't worry too much about it. I included calves because strengthening these muscles are important to wrestlers, any time you on your feet your using calves to maneuver and to generate power, so don't throw them by the wayside. You can substitute dumbbell rows for barbell rows, dumbbell presses for bench press, dumbbell curls, skull-crushers for French press, etc. etc. there's a lot of potential for variety so don't get bored. That's about all I have to say about wrestling and bodybuilding, until next time. 


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ENDURANCE PROGRAM 


The long-distance phase. Running a long distance at seven to nine m.p.h. (about an eight-minute mile) will raise the heartbeat rate to about 150 beats per minute. The heart must reach this level for at least 15 minutes for any positive improvement in endurance. This type of training should be done on alternate days on a soft surface to prevent shin splints and foot injuries. 

A stronger heart will be able to pump blood to the muscles and waste material will be eliminated from tissue more rapidly. The long-distance phase should cover the first four weeks of a conditioning program or preseason workout. 

The jog and stride phase. The second stage of the endurance program requires alternate jogging and striding over a long distance without a rest period. This kind of training is done over two to three miles with the athlete doing alternate stages of jogging 200 yards and striding 200 yards. The important point is that there is no rest period over the entire distance. 

As your heart becomes stronger, more oxygen will be transferred through the blood system into the muscles. This will help prevent early fatigue. As your mind adapts to an increased workload, you will be able to ignore the discomforts that precede fatigue. Willingness to accept pain complements your efforts to sustain grueling activity. 

The jog and stride sequence prepares your body for intense efforts after short recovery periods. You begin to train through the "pain threshold" and to develop mental toughness. 

The interval training phase. The third stage of the endurance program is speed work at a given pace with a timed rest period. The athlete is required to run distances of 120-220 yards, with a rest period in the range of 30-90 seconds. 

The duration of the rest period is crucial. Any rest period of less than 30 seconds does not allow the heart enough recovery time. A rest period of more than 90 seconds is too long, since it allows the heart rate to drop sufficiently to prevent any endurance gains. 


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Wrestling Drills

 

Here is a case study of a wrestler who wanted to improve power out of the bottom position and to improve quickness off the whistle and the opponent's movements. 
This program is designed to work on your reaction time and defensive power. These exercises can be done throughout your workouts and some may require a partner. Some of the exercises will have you working on your bottom position and getting to your feet. They will be very specific to what you do in a match because some of the best ways to train is to complete the moves you may have weaknesses in and that way you will specifically strengthen those moves. 
The power exercises should be done about every 2 -3 days. Just take at least a day off in between workouts or put them with your strength training or power day. The power development exercises should be done with explosiveness and speed. The reaction drills can be done every other day. Some of these drills are you reacting from the partner's first movement. This will help you with reacting to the whistle but more importantly help you with defending any movement initiated by the challenger. Rest about 1-2 minutes between sets with all power exercises. 


The reaction drills only need about 30 seconds between sets. Stay fresh and focus on quality with all exercises: 

The Routine 

Reaction Drills 

Two point stance drill 3 sets x 10 reps 
Tennis Ball Drop 3 sets x 10 reps 
Wrestlers Get Up 6 sets x 10 reps 
Turnovers 3 sets x 10 reps 
Hand-Eye Ball Drops 3 sets x 10 reps 
Take Downs 3 sets x 10 reps 


Power Drills 

Wrestlers Get-Ups with resistance 3 sets x 6 reps 
Underhand Throw with medicine ball 3 sets x 5 reps 
Chest Pass with medicine ball 3 sets x 8 reps 
Backward Throw with med. ball 3 sets x 8 reps 
Power Drop with med. ball 3 sets x 8 reps 
Three point stance with hurdle jump 3 sets x 5 reps 
Take Downs with resistance cord 2 sets x 5 reps 
Click Here For A Printable Log Of The Routine! 

Exercise Descriptions 

Wrestlers Two-point Stance Drill 

Assume a standing defensive position with your hands it front of you. 
Have partner or trainer stand 5 feet away with a tennis ball. Toss ball at the athletes legs or waist. React to the ball and at least block it with a hand or catch it before it hits you. The partner can throw the ball harder and quicker if the athlete can catch it comfortably. 
Repeat according to prescribed repetitions. 


Tennis Ball Drop 

Have partner or trainer stand 10 feet away holding a tennis ball in each hand out to the sides at shoulder height. 
You stand with one foot in front of the other in the "ready" position. 
Partner will drop one of the tennis balls (his or her choice). You must sprint towards the ball before it bounces twice. 
Return to start point and repeat according to prescribed repetitions. 
Remember to drive on the first step and not "stutter step" to reduce reaction time. 


Wrestlers Get Up 


Wrestler starts in the down position with a partner on top. The partner says go and the wrestler gets up to their feet as fast as possible. The partner provides about 10-20% resistance. The athlete focuses on speed and explosion so pop out of that bottom position with a lot of power until you get to your feet. 

Turnovers 


Athlete 1 starts with palms up and arms extended out if front of them. Athlete 2 places their hands over athlete 1's but not touching, athlete 1 now tries to slap the top of athlete 2's hands. When athlete 1 misses then switch positions. 

Hand-Eye Ball Drops 


Athlete 1 starts with their hands at hip height in front of their body and their palms facing down. Athlete 2 now places a tennis ball just above and between athlete 1's hands and then drops it. Athlete 1 must react and catch the ball, with only one hand, before it hits the ground. Athlete 1 cannot turn their hand over, the palm must be facing down all the time. Make sure to use both hands equally. To make this more challenging try dropping the ball from below athlete 1's hands to enlist faster motion 

Take Downs 


Athlete starts in their two-point stance facing a partner also in a two point stance. The partner initiates movement and shoots in for a take down. Athlete needs to defend and react and prevent the partner from getting their arms around the athlete's hips or legs. If the partner is able to grab a leg or hips then they win. Repeat from the start. Athlete wins if they get their hands in front to block the take down attempt and prevents any gain of control from the partner. 

Wrestlers Get Up (With resistance) 

Wrestler starts in the down position with a partner on top. 
The partner says go and the wrestler gets up to their feet as fast as possible. The partner provides about 70-80% resistance. The athlete focuses on speed and explosion so pop out of that bottom position with a lot of power until you get to your feet. 


Underhand Throw 

Stand in quarter-squat position with trunk flexed forward and ball held between legs. Arms should be slightly bent. 
Have a partner or trainer stand approximately 10-15 yards away. 
Perform underhand toss as far as you can, using the legs to explode up. 
Have partner catch ball on the bounce and return the ball. Athlete should catch ball after a bounce and repeat as prescribed. Variations - single leg underhand throw. 


Chest Pass 

Stand with feet slightly wider than hip-width apart. Knees should be slightly bent. Hold medicine ball to chest and pass forward as far as possible to a partner or trainer. Catch ball on the bounce from your partner and repeat according to prescribed repetitions. 
Sports Application - explosive push-off with arms 
Variations - single leg throw, seated with back supported, seated on stability ball 

Backwards Throw 

Stand with feet slightly wider than hip-width apart. Have a partner or trainer stand approximately 10-15 yards behind you. Grasp ball and lower body into a semi-squat position. Explode up extending the entire body and throwing medicine ball up, over and behind the body. The goal is to throw the ball behind you as far as you and generating most of the power in the legs. Catch ball on the bounce from your partner and repeat according to prescribed repetitions. 
Variations - single leg, seated on stability ball. 

Power Drop 

Assume back-lying position on ground with arms extended up over chest. Partner or trainer stands on box behind your head holding the medicine ball at arms length. Partner or trainer drops ball towards hands. Catch medicine ball and immediately propel the ball back to partner or trainer. 4. Repeat according to prescribed repetitions. 
Sports Application - explosive push-off of arms 

Three-Point Stance with Single Leg Hurdle Hop 

Assume a three-point stance position with the hurdle 2-3 feet in front of you. 
Explode up and over the hurdle by pushing off the forward foot. Other leg should be driven up to help clear hurdle. Land on both feet and repeat according to prescribed repetitions. 
Sports Application - blocking, explosive starts from three point stance 

Take Downs with resistance cord 


Athlete starts in their two-point stance with a resistance cord around their waist facing a partner also in a two-point stance. A third partner provides the resistance behind the athlete holding the resistance cord. The athlete initiates movement and shoots in for a take down. Partner needs to defend and react and prevent the athlete from getting their arms around the partners hips or legs. If the athlete is able to grab a leg or hips then they win. Repeat from the start. 

Partner wins if they get their hands in front to block the take down attempt and/or prevents any gain of control from the partner. 


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NUTRITION GUIDELINES 

1. When possible, choose low-fat or non-fat products such as light cream cheese, light mayonnaise, 1% or skim milk.

2. Avoid cheese, nuts and fatty meats. All are high-fat items and add extra calories even in small portions.

3. Cut back on fried foods. Meats that are boiled, broiled, or grilled and vegetables that are boiled or steamed are better choices.

4. Remove the skin before eating chicken or turkey.

5. Use water-packed tuna.

6. Eat at least one dark green or yellow/orange vegetable every day, e.g., spinach, carrots, and tomatoes.

7. Eat a food that is a good source of vitamin C every day, e.g., spinach, carrots, and tomatoes.

8. Drink plenty of water.

9. Cut back on the amount of fats you add to foods, e.g., butter, margarine, mayonnaise, sour cream, regular salad dressing.

10. Eat foods that are high in complex carbohydrates often. This includes starchy vegetables, legumes (beans and peas), breads, cereals and other grain foods. 

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Intensity 

Emphasize intensity in your conditioning workouts.  Maximum gains will not occur unless an athlete works at maximum intensity.  Exercise through the full range of movement.  If an athlete does not perform every exercise through the full range of movement, he eventually will lose flexibility in the joint areas, as well as fail to develop muscular fitness through the full range of movement. He will also be more prone to injury. 

Exercise antagonistic muscle groups. Within the body, there are four major antagonistic (opposing) muscle groups. 

chest/lats
biceps/triceps 
abdominals/lower 
back quads/hamstrings
 

Whenever possible, the athlete should exercise the potentially larger and stronger muscles of the body first. The athlete should progress from the muscles of the legs, to the torso, to the arms, to the abdominals, and finish with the muscles of the neck. 

A workout program should be performed three days a week with adequate rest between individual workouts. The first couple of workouts concentrate on form and balance in the squat snatch, dead lifting more with your legs than your back, rolling your shoulders back at the top of your lift. Do only three sets of nine repetitions, even though you feel you can do more. On the next two sets of nine, the last two of ten; then three sets of ten; then two of ten and one of eleven and so on. 

When you can do three sets of 11, move to four sets of nine. This way your goal is one more rep at a time, or one more set, the biggest jump being three reps, i.e., 3 x 11 = 33, 4 x 9 = 36. When you can do four sets of 11, increase the weight by 5% and drop back to three sets of 9. This way you can achieve a positive, realistic gain every time; plus, you only have to work on one exercise at a time, so the potential for gain is always there. 

When you finish your last set of dead lifts, take a couple of old-fashioned plates, the kind without the grooves, and carry them for as long as you can, pinching them in your hands. See what a combination of dead lifting and carrying a plate does for your grip. Incidentally, when you dot the dead lifts, keep both hands facing the same way. It will help your grip because the bar can more easily roll out of your hands. 

Another factor to work against is time. Be concerned about it. Work slowly at first, but as you train, know how long a complete workout takes and then work to beat it. Start your weight training program in this manner. As you get into your program, keep a record of the total amount of weights you have lifted within a given time. 

Each morning upon awakening, record your pulse (the lower the better). This will help make you more conscious of your physical condition. It can also be an indicator when something is wrong. If your pulse suddenly jumps up several points, it may mean that you have not fully recovered from the previous day's efforts, that you did not get enough rest, or that your body is fighting off an infection. In any case, it is a sign to back off; let your body recover before continuing to train hard. 

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Weight Training for Wrestling

Due to the nature of wrestling, weight training is a necessity to be a champion. It will increase your endurance in combat, your durability through the long season, your explosive power in execution of technique, and your overall confidence as a wrestler. This program is good for the in-season as it allows you to work every body part twice a week in only three days. I like this split because you can maintain your strength while at the same time recovering from hard wrestling workouts.

General Overview of Program:

Monday and Wednesday:

bulletHeavy days - lower reps 
bullet60 seconds rest between sets 
bulletSuper sets when possible 

Friday:

bulletOverall body day. 
bulletMaximum intensity (no rest between sets). 
bulletHigher reps (muscle failure). 

Try set all the weights up ahead of time on Fridays and go from one exercise to the other with minimal rest time. A good partner can help by pushing you and having the weights ready for the next lift.

The Program:

 Monday

Body Part 

Exercise

Sets

Repetitions

Whole Body

 

 

 

 

Power Cleans

2 sets

8-12 reps

Chest

 

 

 

 

*Bench

3 sets

8-12 reps

 

*Flyes 

2 sets

8-12 reps

 

*Incline Bench

2 sets

8-12 reps

Shoulders

 

 

 

 

*Military Press

3 sets

8-12 reps

 

Front Raises

2 sets

8-12 reps

Triceps 

 

 

 

 

*Pushdowns

2 sets

8-12 reps

 

Dips

2 sets

8-12 reps

Abs 

 

 

 

 

Crunches

2-5 sets

50 reps

 Wednesday

Body Part 

Exercise

Sets

Repetitions

Legs

 

 

 

 

Squats

3 sets

8-12 reps 

 

Extensions 

2 sets

8-12 reps

 

Ham Curls

2 sets

8-12 reps

 

Lunges

2 sets

8-12 reps

Back

 

 

 

 

Lat Pull Down

3 sets

8-12 reps

 

Pull Ups

3 sets

8-12 reps

Biceps  

 

 

 

 

Curls (inside grip)

2 sets

8-12 reps

 

Curls (outside grip)

2 sets

8-12 reps

Abs 

 

 

 

 

Crunches

2-5 sets

50 reps

Friday

Body Part 

Exercise

Sets

Repetitions

Whole Body

 

 

 

 

Power Cleans

1 set

12-15 reps

Chest

 

 

 

 

*Bench

1 set

12-15 reps

 

*Flyes 

1 set

12-15 reps

Shoulders

 

 

 

 

*Military Press

1 set

12-15 reps

Legs

 

 

 

 

Extensions

1 set

12-15 reps

 

Leg Curl

1 set

12-15 reps

 

Squats

1 set

12-15 reps

Back

 

 

 

 

Lat Pull Down (wide Grip)

1 set

12-15 reps

 

Lat Pull Down (narrow grip)

1 set

12-15 reps

Arms

 

 

 

 

Curls (inside grip)

1 set

12-15 reps

 

Curls (outside grip)

1 set

12-15 reps

 

 

 

 

 

Pushdowns

3 drop sets

10 reps(descending weight)

 

Dips

1 set

10-8 count negatives

Abs 

 

 

 

 

Crunches

2-5 sets

50 reps

 

An asterisk (*) denotes that alternate exercises are acceptable.

 

For example - Substitute straight bar bench for dumbbell bench,

Flat flyes for pec deck or manual resistance flyes,

Triceps pushdowns for extensions etc...

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ENDURANCE PROGRAM 

The long-distance phase. Running a long distance at seven to nine m.p.h. (about an eight-minute mile) will raise the heartbeat rate to about 150 beats per minute. The heart must reach this level for at least 15 minutes for any positive improvement in endurance. This type of training should be done on alternate days on a soft surface to prevent shin splints and foot injuries. 

A stronger heart will be able to pump blood to the muscles and waste material will be eliminated from tissue more rapidly. The long-distance phase should cover the first four weeks of a conditioning program or preseason workout. 

The jog and stride phase. The second stage of the endurance program requires alternate jogging and striding over a long distance without a rest period. This kind of training is done over two to three miles with the athlete doing alternate stages of jogging 200 yards and striding 200 yards. The important point is that there is no rest period over the entire distance. 

As your heart becomes stronger, more oxygen will be transferred through the blood system into the muscles. This will help prevent early fatigue. As your mind adapts to an increased workload, you will be able to ignore the discomforts that precede fatigue. Willingness to accept pain complements your efforts to sustain grueling activity. 

The jog and stride sequence prepares your body for intense efforts after short recovery periods. You begin to train through the "pain threshold" and to develop mental toughness. 

The interval training phase. The third stage of the endurance program is speed work at a given pace with a timed rest period. The athlete is required to run distances of 120-220 yards, with a rest period in the range of 30-90 seconds. 

The duration of the rest period is crucial. Any rest period of less than 30 seconds does not allow the heart enough recovery time. A rest period of more than 90 seconds is too long, since it allows the heart rate to drop sufficiently to prevent any endurance gains. 

GRADUATED TRAINING, LOADING
With running, sparring, and weights, you can increase distance, time, and pounds. These increases will force your body to strengthen both physically and mentally, so that your overall performance will improve. As the demands increase, your body's ability to do harder work increases.

If you are to excel, your body must be pushed to the brink on occasion. As your internal alarm goes off and your body begins to set off its defensive mechanisms, persevere! It is at this point that most of the pain will come, and you need to push to the point of exhaustion.

The final phase.
1. Increase the intensity of the work (e.g., speed).
2. Increase the length of the work (e.g., distance).
3. Increase the number of attempts (e.g., repetitions).
4. Decrease the recovery time. (e.g., rest).
5. Add to workload during recovery (e.g., exercise, jump rope). 

There is no easy way of conditioning. The best conditioner for a wrestler is, of course, wrestling itself, but wrestling is not enough. The heart has to be developed, and your conditioning will be greatly aided by supplementing your training with weight lifting, dancing, running, swimming, gymnastics, soccer, basketball, handball, and other sports and activities. 

Be aware that our physical limitations are unknown, and in the sport of wrestling you must be willing to undergo great physical and mental stress. The mind is the final factor in all victories. Wrestlers must be able to think their way to victory. Pushing yourself farther than you thought you could go strengthens your ability to concentrate beyond pain. This intense preparation prepares you to be a champion.

Bobby Douglas

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WHAT ABOUT STRENGTH AND POWER?

When a wrestler is required to use his muscles, he often forgets to use his head. Strength and power without speed, timing, and position are useless. 

THE WEIGHTS 

Weight programs are a great value. Free weights serve the wrestler better because of the balance factor. When lifting in wrestling, you need to be able to shift your position several times before you can get into the proper position. With the free weights, you can get a better sense of the correct timing along with the strength and balance that are required. I do not believe in lifting heavy weights. 

After I started lifting weights, I could feel additional strength playing a role when I had to finish from a tough position or adjust to a mistake. It would not take as much energy or time; lifting helped my confidence. If you are a good wrestler, and you are trying to get better, the weights will definitely help! If you are injured and have limited time, the weights can make a difference in your rehabilitation and give you the strength to compensate for your injury. Weights allow you to get a workout even when you are injured. I scored many more takedowns after I started lifting. 

INTENSITY 

Emphasize intensity in your conditioning workouts. Maximum gains will not occur unless an athlete works at maximum intensity. Exercise through the full range of movement. If an athlete does not perform every exercise through the full range of movement, he eventually will lose flexibility in the joint areas, as well as fail to develop muscular fitness through the full range of movement. He will also be more prone to injury. 

Exercise antagonistic muscle groups. Within the body, there are four major antagonistic (opposing) muscle groups. 

chest/lats

biceps/triceps 

abdominals/lower 

back quads/hamstrings 

Whenever possible, the athlete should exercise the potentially larger and stronger muscles of the body first. The athlete should progress from the muscles of the legs, to the torso, to the arms, to the abdominals, and finish with the muscles of the neck. 

A workout program should be performed three days a week with adequate rest between individual workouts. The first couple of workouts concentrate on form and balance in the squat snatch, dead lifting more with your legs than your back, rolling your shoulders back at the top of your lift. Do only three sets of nine repetitions, even though you feel you can do more. On the next two sets of nine, the last two of ten; then three sets of ten; then two of ten and one of eleven and so on. 

When you can do three sets of 11, move to four sets of nine. This way your goal is one more rep at a time, or one more set, the biggest jump being three reps, i.e., 3 x 11 = 33, 4 x 9 = 36. When you can do four sets of 11, increase the weight by 5% and drop back to three sets of 9. This way you can achieve a positive, realistic gain every time; plus, you only have to work on one exercise at a time, so the potential for gain is always there. 

When you finish your last set of dead lifts, take a couple of old-fashioned plates, the kind without the grooves, and carry them for as long as you can, pinching them in your hands. See what a combination of dead lifting and carrying a plate does for your grip. Incidentally, when you dot the dead lifts, keep both hands facing the same way. It will help your grip because the bar can more easily roll out of your hands. 

Another factor to work against is time. Be concerned about it. Work slowly at first, but as you train, know how long a complete workout takes and then work to beat it. Start your weight training program in this manner. As you get into your program, keep a record of the total amount of weights you have lifted within a given time. 

Each morning upon awakening, record your pulse (the lower the better). This will help make you more conscious of your physical condition. It can also be an indicator when something is wrong. If your pulse suddenly jumps up several points, it may mean that you have not fully recovered from the previous day's efforts, that you did not get enough rest, or that your body is fighting off an infection. In any case, it is a sign to back off; let your body recover before continuing to train hard. 

 

Bobby Douglas

 

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STRETCHING AND FLEXIBILITY

Stretch before and after every workout. Stretching is not a competitive effort; each individual has his own level of flexibility. Stretching is for self-improvement. Each athlete should be working solely to improve his own ability. 

1. Always relax as you stretch.
2. Breathe normally as you stretch.
3. Do not stretch to a point at which you feel pain.
4. Never compare yourself with someone else regarding flexibility.
5. Never bounce as you stretch.
6. Stretch your tightest side first.
7. Stretch as often as possible.

Pay particular attention to #5; do not bounce during stretching. This is dangerous, and an athlete who does this rather than completing a smooth and gradual movement is risking injury. The bounce actually forces the muscle to tighten in an effort to protect itself. Eventually, the forced motion can result in a muscle injury. 

Flexibility comes with time; as in all areas of conditioning, a consistent effort is necessary. It is important to stretch often, and certainly before practice and after competition. 

Bobby Douglas

 

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Conditioning Routines O' Plenty 

Here are some conditioning routines that I thought everyone might be interested in. 
All of these are brief (20 min. or less) routines that can fit anyone's hectic schedule 
and still allow for recovery from the weights. In fact, many of these routines can be 
done after a short break post workout: I usually train, take a 20 min. break, and then 
go through one of the following: 

400's on the treadmill 

Exercise Time: 60 seconds 
Rest interval: 2:30 
Speed: determined by fitness level (fast enough to raise heart rate to 85% or 
above). Work up to 12-13 mph. 
Number of reps: 5 
*raise the speed or incline once you can complete all the reps. This one can also be 
done on the football field or track. 

200's 

Same as above, but the work interval is 30 sec., the rest interval is 1:15 and the # 
of reps is now 10. 

Stationary Bike Workout 

Exercise time: 30 sec. 
Rest interval: 1:15 
Reps: 10 
RPM's: determined by present fitness level. The bout should cause the heart rate to 
climb above 85%. Pick an RPM # and do not fall below that number for the entire 
work bout. This # will vary depending on the brand of bike used. On a lifecycle, don't 
drop below 110; on a Spinnaker, don't drop below 95. Once you can complete all the 
reps without falling below your RPM goal, raise your goal by 3-5 RPM the next 
workout. 

110's 

*done on the field or track 
Time: between 15-20 sec. 
Rest interval: 45 sec. 
# of reps: 10-12 
**decrease time, lower the rest interval, or add reps each workout. 

40's 

Time: go all out 

Rest interval: 35 sec. 
# of reps: 14 
**see 110's progression guidelines above 

Up Back's 

*use a field or gym 
Time: 15-20 seconds 
Rest interval: 45 sec. 
# of reps: 12 
Rep #1: sprint 5 yards forward, touch the line (or cone), back pedal to starting line. 
Immediately sprint forward 10 yds, back pedal back to the starting line, and then 
sprint to the 15 yd. line/cone and back pedal to starting line. 

Rep #2: same as above, but this time, carioca. 

Rep #3: same but this time lateral shuffle 

Repeat reps 1,2,& 3 until 12 reps are performed. 
*feel free to mix up the reps (sprint & carioca, shuffle to back pedal, etc.) 

Hope these were helpful. 2 progressive workouts/week will keep the heart strong and 
healthy. If you are conscious of your nutrition habits, this is all the work you'll need. 
If your habits are poor, combine these workouts with long duration, leisurely walking 
2-3 times weekly to create a further caloric deficit in order to stay lean. 

P.J Streit 

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Tips For Increasing Foot Speed and Coordination

Kendall Cross 
Olympic Gold Medalist
November 1999 

"Allow your daydreams to become your plans." 

"If it were easy, everybody would be doing it." 

How and Why 

Throughout the many camps and clinics I conduct, I have been asked how to increase foot speed and agility. Foot speed in wrestling can be an advantage, but keep in mind, it doesn't necessarily make or break your chances of winning. The good wrestlers, whether they are fast or slow, will adjust their strategy to accommodate their strengths and weaknesses. 

For example: Dave Schultz, Olympic & World Champion, and arguably the most technical wrestler we've ever had, claimed he was not as fast as many of his opponents. Therefore, against faster opponents, he always maintained a controlled tie-up in order to close the distance from his opponent. By controlling a tie-up, Dave was able to achieve two objectives. One: he was close to his opponent and could use the tie to set up an attack. Two: he eliminated his opponent's chances of using speed from outside (of tie-ups) because he forced a tie-up. 

Conversely, Kenny Monday (Olympic Champion, 1988) possessed incredible speed. His comparative advantage was to attack from outside (of tie-ups) in order to utilize his speed. His opponents had difficulty reacting to his quick attacks. 

So, here are three exercises you can perform to increase your foot speed. 

1. Shadow Drilling

Drill your standing techniques (from your feet) as vigorously as possible (sans partner) for intervals of 1-3 minutes at a time. The idea is to create constant motion while executing your standing techniques. This builds your endurance for fast twitch reaction and cardiovascular capacity. This exercise is best performed after practice when your body is fatigued. John Smith (6-time World Champion & 2-time Olympic Champion) was the consummate shadow driller. John spent many hours shadow drilling. If you've had the pleasure of seeing him wrestle, you've noticed his incredible speed and agility. 

2. Jump-roping or Speed-roping: 

Jumping rope develops foot movement that is so desired by boxers, who must be quick and agile on their feet. It develops the cardiovascular system as well. Jump rope as often as possible, and at least 15 minutes before and after each practice. 

3. Box Jumps: 

Box jumps are executed using a sturdy wooden box (or any sturdy platform) that stands about 1 to 2 feet high from the floor. Standing next to the box, you jump up onto the top. Then you immediately jump off to the other side. So, in essence, you are jumping from side to side with the box positioned in the middle of your jump. You will land on the box each time you jump to the side, and will continue by landing on the other side of the box. 

Box jumps improve quickness as well as power in the legs. They are also effective in developing the cardiovascular system. As a wrestler at Oklahoma State, we spent many practices jumping on and off of wooden boxes. Not much fun, but great for foot speed. 

Go get 'em! Kendall Cross - Olympic Gold Medalist 

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Wrestling Training Tips For Pre-Season 

Kendall Cross 
Olympic Gold Medalist
October 1997 

"Today's Preparation Determines Tomorrow's Success" 

"All worthwhile things come from hard work and careful planning." 

Goal Setting 

In considering how you should approach the upcoming season, you must develop your long-term and short-term goals. Consider what you want to achieve this year, and then set a plan for achieving. Follow that plan with specific training to accomplish your goals. This excerpt is for the serious wrestler. 

First, set very lofty goals for yourself. People that work hard toward their goals tend to attain their goals. Therefore, if your goals are merely average, then your accomplishments will be merely average. I have always set extremely high goals for myself. By doing so, I expected much more from myself than I would have without those high goals in place. My favorite quote concerning goal-setting is this: 
"If you want to sail the high seas, you can't be afraid to step away from the shore." 

I don't know who wrote it, but it holds a lot of truth. By the way, if you haven't noticed by now, I dig quotes! 

Second, consider what it will take for you to accomplish your goals. This means you should set short-term goals as your blueprint for reaching your long-term goals. Think about what you should do daily, weekly, and monthly in pursuit of your dream. Do yourself a favor by writing your goals down on paper. This will give you a visual that you can refer to at any time. While training for the Olympics, I placed my goals all over my house. By doing this, I could constantly be reminded of my daily objectives. For example, on my fridge, I placed a sign that said "Eat right & you will win!" Over my bed, I placed a sign that said "Get up & work out while your opponent sleeps!" I was motivated by these little extras. They made a difference in my training habits. 
Training Specifics 

Now let's talk about the specific training. In the pre-season, it is important that you develop a good aerobic base for endurance, and maintain a lifting program for strength. You should not neglect these two aspects of training in the pre-season. Consider your pre-season to be a training phase that conditions your body for the intensity of a long season. 

The Run 

I recommend long-distance running to develop your aerobic shape. If you haven't been working out, start out with 2 to 3 miles every other day (M-W-F). After about one week, increase your distance to 4 miles. Gradually increase your distance to 5 miles. Challenge yourself on these runs. Strap your Ironman to your wrist and time your 5-mile runs. Try to decrease your times on each run. 

The Lift 

First and foremost, I recommend consulting a weight training coach for proper lifting techniques. You don't want to injure yourself before you're out of the starting gates. Lifting during the pre-season should consist of heavier weights with less repitition for three days a week. By that, I mean you should lift in sets of 3 or 4, and within each set, do 8-10 reps. Try to use "wrestling specific" lifting techniques. Full-body lifts such as the clean & jerk and the hang-clean are good for wrestling. As wrestlers, we utilize our pulling muscles. Rope climbing is great for wrestlers. The Russians are big on rope climbing. Also, lifting helps in avoiding injuries. I wasn't crazy about lifting, but forced myself to do it. It paid off. 

Stretching 

Also, I want to emphasize the importance of stretching. Flexibility is a weapon! Not only can you avoid injuries with good flexibility, you can get out of many compromising positions. Stretch as often as possible. At least once a day. Stretch while doing your homework, while watching TV, and always after workouts. 

Keep in mind this is not comprehensive training advice. Discuss your training plan with your coach. Chances are, he has "been there & done that." I learned a great deal from my coaches. That's why they are the coaches. I wish you all the best in your upcoming season! And here's another quote for you: 

"Victory comes at a price. The question we must ask ourselves is: What are we willing to pay?" 

Go get 'em! Kendall Cross - Olympic Gold Medalist 

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Me And My Gator Gum

You may be wondering what Gator gum is or for that matter what is it for.  No it is not for catching alligators.  Well, since I am now thirty-five years old and I believe Gator gum is a thing of the past, I will explain.  There is a gum that will make your mouth water more than any other gum past or present.  So what could this possibly benefit?  Present wrestlers and we former wrestlers understand oh so well.  The more you water the more you spit.

I was just a measly one hundred and five pound wrestler when I was a junior in high school.  To give you an even better perspective of where I came from, I wrestled the 85lbs weight class as a freshmen and I now weight 216lbs.  You may think wow, how skinny!  However, I was not skinny enough.  I was stuck in the rut many high school and college wrestlers get stuck in.  Losing large amounts of weight in order to wrestle smaller people.  Is this healthy?  Is this logical?  Probably not!  Can this process be safer?  I can give you tips that will spare your hard earned muscle and decrease your weight through fat and water loss and you will live to talk about it.

It would be 1985 and 4AM Saturday morning.  The Hemet High wrestling team would be jammed into two large station wagons.  We would be on our way to another wrestling tournament.  I was fresh out of my plastic suit that I slept in all night underneath the heating blanket that was on high.  I had my empty cup in hand.  Now comes my Gator gum.  The mouth-watering tree tar would cause saliva to flow.  We wrestlers pushing the weight barrier would spit in the cup all the way to the tournament.  I cannot tell you how many times I filled that cup just trying to get rid of the last quarter pound.

So drastic.  This was not all that I would go through.  During wrestling season I would eat two eggs for breakfast, couple rice cakes for lunch, and salad for dinner.  I would not eat anything the day before or drink anything a two days before weigh-ins.  If I only new.  This method of torture was counter productive to the sport I was in and was doing long-term damage.  I was causing my body to use my hard earned muscle as an energy source and not the fat I wanted so hard to get rid of.  Well, actually I probably did not have any fat, seeing how skinny as I was.  So how can this process be safer, increase your performance, and spare your muscle?

Unfortunately I had two years of experience of drastic weight loss measures in wrestling.  I swore that was it and I was never going to diet again.  Along comes bodybuilding.  Now I had to learn to loose all the body fat and loose no muscle.  This is obvious why.  My dieting skills I learned in wrestling will be of no help here. 

What I learned.

  1. You need food for energy
  2. You need water to keep you body cool
  3. Creatine and a wrestlers diet will lead to serious health consequences
  4. Diuretics will do long term damage
  5. Sodium is the key to short term weight loss
  6. Carbohydrates control will help control water
  7. Distilled water works wonders

As a bodybuilder my body fat was as low as humanly possibly.  To a wrestler this is all you can ask for.  I lost 32 pounds in 20 weeks weighing in at 174lbs for the Mr. Idaho.  I was week and tired but in far better shape then going through a wrestlers diet.  I was healthier too.  I also drank and ate lots up till the night before the show.  Wrestlers can do the same.  Your athletic performance will fare better if you continue you intake of food and water.

So how do you loose weight you ask while eating and drinking up till the night before a meet.  You do this by eliminating all sodium.  This causes your body to shed large amounts of water even though you continue to drink.  When I mean no sodium I mean you do not use toothpaste because of the sodium content.  You can continue to eat because you are doing aerobic workouts burning the calories you consume.  You do not need diuretics nor do you need to starve.

I also learned through my bodybuilding experience that it is non-sense to wear plastic suits during practice and to sit in saunas to sweat.  Your urinary tract is your best friend hear.  If your body is 70% percent water and sodium holds water, this is your key to success.  Carbohydrates are also a water pig.  Cut your carbohydrate down and increase your protein the last week prior to a meet.   Carbohydrates hold water in the muscle cell.  Cut these little guys back and you will loose weight.  Too much though will cause a loss in endurance and strength.  The increase in protein will spare your muscle during the diet.

After weigh ins your first priority MUST be to replenish your water supply and glycogen supply.  Your glycogen must be replenished using simple and complex sugars and carbohydrates.   The bacon and egg breakfast is an absolute no no.  This was my favorite in high school yet it does not help your performance.  It will actually hinder it to an extent.  Gatorade helps tremendously and should be gulped down as soon as your naked foot hits the floor as you step off the scale.

I hope these few hints will help your performance.  I hope you discontinue the pattern our coaches have watched for years and have done nothing about.  You can be a better wrestler, weight less, and step off the scales with a smile on your face.  This article by no means describes all there is to know to successfully pull off this diet.  For further help and guidance see Strength-n-Speed services.

Chris Berry 10/17/01

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To Stretch

Warming-up is more important then stretching before physical activity.  It almost goes without saying that athletes should stretch before playing or working out.  But, a surprising amount of new research is questioning that belief and challenging the notion that stretching is effective in improving performance.  Surprisingly, there is little scientific evidence to support the performance benefits theory of stretching.  In fact, recent research has begun to demonstrate that stretching prior to physical activity actually decreases performance.

Researchers at California State University, Chico observed the effects stretching had on vertical jump technique and performance.  After a 3 minute warm-up on stationary bike, one half the subjects rested while the other half performed a series of stretches.  Results indicated that over half the subjects in the stretching group decreased jumping performance following stretching.  The researchers note that decreasing muscle stiffness is primarily related to increased muscle temperature and not the effect of stretching.  Furthermore, stretching during the warm-up period for dynamic physical activity may be counterproductive to vertical jump performance.  It was concluded that warming up the muscles prior to activity was more beneficial than stretching before activity.

Knudson, D., Bennet, K., Corn, R., Leick, D., and Smith, C., Acute Effects of stretching Are not Evident in the Kinematics of the Vertical Jump, JSCR Vol 15(1), 2001, p. 98.

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Daily Nutrition Tips

bulletMales 16 and younger should maintain at least 7% body fat; older males should maintain at least 5% body fat. 
bulletNever try to lose more than 2 pounds per week. This will minimize loss of muscle tissue. 
bulletDon't rely only on diet to lose weight; training for endurance burns fat, and weight training increases muscle; both can reduce the percentage of body fat. 
bulletEnergy needs depend on body size. The smallest wrestlers need at least 1700 calories per day. If your weight drops more than 2-3 pounds per week, eat more servings of fruits, vegetables, and grains. 
bulletMaintain normal fluid intake and drink back 150% of the weight you lose in practice or a match to minimize dehydration and early fatigue. 
bulletEat well-balanced meals that emphasize fruits, vegetables cereals, and grains, which are rich in carbohydrates. 
bulletReduce intake of fatty foods such as butter, oils, dressings, and fried foods. Eat foods that are baked, boiled, or broiled. 
bulletChoose fluids that help rehydrate and refuel your body. Sports drinks containing carbohydrate (14-17 grams/8 ounces) and a small amount of sodium chloride (salt) are formulated to meet these goals. 
bulletAfter weighing in, rehydrate with sports drinks and consider well-balanced meal-replacement drinks or high-carbohydrate energy drinks to top off your energy reserves without causing abdominal discomfort. 
bulletAt fast-food restaurants, choose the lower-fat items such as salads, grilled sandwiches, and low-fat yogurt.

11/30/01

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Wrestling: Making Weight and Staying Strong

Wrestlers often feel they will compete their best at low body weight levels. To lose weight and still acquire championship success requires a sound nutrition plan. Techniques to lose weight such as crash diets, fluid restriction, laxative and diuretic use are dangerous practices that result in dehydration and heat illness. Low energy intake and dehydration hurt muscular endurance and lead to stale performance on the mat. How can wrestlers stay on track with healthy weight loss and maintain peak performance? 

Sport Nutrition Tips For Wrestlers

Assess body fat composition pre-season. Wrestlers with 5 percent or lower body fat cannot afford further weight loss without loss of muscle weight. Healthy fat percentages for wrestlers range between 7-15 percent. 

Weigh wrestlers before and after practice for fluid weight loss but assess body fat loss by a weekly change in weight on the scale. If weight loss is achievable wrestlers can safely lose 1-3 pounds of body fat per week. Remember for each pound of body weight lost during a wrestling practice, athletes need to drink 3 cups of fluid per pound to replace muscle fluid levels. 

Wrestlers need to drink a minimum of 80-96 oz of fluids per day such as Gatorade, water, juices, decaffeinated beverages, milk, etc. Have athletes keep a log of fluid intake early in the season to make sure they are adequately hydrated. Athletes should drink at least 1 cup of fluid every 15-20 minutes during practice. Wrestlers trying to lose weight need to eat a minimum of 1,500 calories per day with a focus on adequate carbohydrate, protein and lower fat foods. Eating frequent small meals 

SAMPLE FLUID INTAKE LOG

Time: Fluid Choice: 8 a.m. 8 oz skim milk 12 oz orange juice 10 a.m. 12 oz decaf cola 11 a.m. 8 oz skim milk 20 oz bottle water 2 p.m. 20 oz Gatorade 3 p.m. 16 oz water 20 oz Gatorade 6 p.m. 8 oz skim milk 16 oz water

SAMPLE HEALTHY WEIGHT LOSS PLAN

Breakfast
8 oz skim milk
1 oz corn flakes
1 slice of wheat toast with 1 tsp. margarine
1 banana 

Lunch
8 oz low-fat chocolate milk
3 oz turkey luncheon meat
2 slices of wheat bread
1 tsp. mustard
1 oz pretzels
1 apple

Snack (before wrestling)
20 oz Gatorade thirst quencher
2 low-fat granola bars and 1 orange 

Dinner
8 oz skim milk
3 oz baked skinless chicken breast
1 cup rice
1 cup steamed broccoli
1 cup fresh fruit with 2 tbsp. low-fat whipped cream topping

is more desirable for losing weight than skipping meals.

What and when should a wrestler eat before a match? Focus on fluids and carbohydrates. Ideally a wrestler should eat at least 3 hours before the competition and choose foods high in carbohydrates (see the sample lunch above). A small snack after weigh-in is also recommended. Drink at least 16 oz of fluid within the hour before the match. A sport drink containing carbohydrate is an ideal choice during this time. 

During a tournament, what should wrestlers eat between matches?
The wrestler should continue to focus on hydration, specifically choosing beverages that contain energy and electrolytes. Sports drinks between matches would be ideal choices. Wrestlers should also eat high-carbohydrate snacks. Sample high-carbohydrate snacks to pack for tournaments are: low-fat granola bars, pretzels, bagels, crackers, high-carbohydrate energy bars, fig bars and fruit. 

Remember to begin losing weight slowly before the season starts. Focus on hydration and healthy eating in season! Good luck!

By PAGE LOVE, M.S., R.D., L.D., sports nutritionist, Nutrifit and Nutrisport Consulting (Atlanta, GA)

11/30/01

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